Month: November 2017

The Kering groups against violence on women in the White Ribbon campaign

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THE WHITE RIBBON CAMPAIGN

 

Kering Foundation launches the White Ribbon Campaign 2017 online to raise awareness of the new generations of violence against women. With the white ribbon Christopher Kane, Joseph Altuzarra, Stella McCartney, Salma Hayek, Alessandro Michele and Dennis Chan.

The campaign, which started yesterday (20 November) and ends on 25 – when it will resort to the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women – wants to capture the attention of the Z generation to provoke a profound and sustainable cultural change on the theme globally.

The #ICouldHaveBeen campaign and the dedicated site icouldhavebeen.org want to reflect on the fact that women of all ages are exposed to a high risk of violence, simply to be born of a female gender.

The public is invited to imagine her life as “her”: the woman on three who is in the world a victim of violence, though no one, as the creators point to, can really understand what she is doing without having really suffered a violence.

Among the official ambassadors of the initiative are Christopher Kane, Joseph Altuzarra, Alessandro Michele and Dennis Chan, who have been photographed with the name that their parents could choose in the hypothesis that they were female females.

Fashion designer Stella McCartney and actress Salma Hayek (wife of François-Henri Pinault, owner of the Kering group), who are part of the board of the foundation, appear in the campaign with the generic “her” (pictured).

About Z-Generation, as reported by the Kering Foundation, every two seconds in the world a girl under the age of 18 is forced to marry.

A teenager over three, between 13 and 15, is bullied regularly. 15 million girls between the ages of 15 and 19 claim to have experienced non-consensual sexual relations in their lives. Over the past 12 months, 9 million girls have been subjected to sexual assault.

Sara Dal Monte

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Breakfast at Tiffany? now we can…

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TIFFANY NEW YORK

 

There are certain movie scenes that are so iconic that they still retain their importance in the pop-culture lexicon, even decades later. When Holly Golightly, played by Audrey Hepburn, stepped out of a yellow cab and sauntered to the window of Tiffany & Co. in the 1961 film “Breakfast at Tiffany’s,” with Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer’s “Moon River” playing in the background, such a scene was created.

As Holly ate a croissant and carried a cup of coffee, she was still, unfortunately, on the outside of the building. Since 1837, Tiffany’s has been a preeminent luxury jeweler and not a place where you could actually have breakfast. However, that changed on Friday, with the opening of the Blue Box Café, at the company’s venerable flagship store at Fifth Avenue and 57th Street in New York City. Menu items will be seasonal and reflect a sophisticated take on a variety of New York dishes.

Located on the fourth floor of the building, which houses a recently renovated home and accessories section, the café is a bright, airy space, with the “Breakfast at Tiffany” breakfast starting at $29. The offering comes with coffee or tea, followed by a croissant and seasonal fruit and rounded out with your choice of a buttermilk waffle, smoked salmon and bagel stack, truffle eggs, or avocado toast.

The prix fixe lunch, which includes a starter and main courses like the Fifth Avenue salad, with Maine lobster, grapefruit and poppyseed dressing, and an olive-oil poached salmon, with caviar and smashed potatoes, costs $39.

With a nod to the long-heralded regality of the location, there is also a “Tiffany Tea” menu offering ($49), featuring teas by Bellocq, as well as a selection of finger sandwiches and bakery items. Individual sweets and warm beverages are also available, from an espresso ($5) to a slice of chocolate mousse cake ($12).

The café, outfitted with tables that can accommodate many different group sizes, is accentuated by heavy usage of the company’s classic robin’s-egg blue motif on everything from the walls to the plates. Only two blocks from the southern boundary of Central Park, the café has an excellent window view of the popular destination.

With many traditional retailers losing customers at their brick and mortar locations to online competitors, there has been an increased focus on cultivating experiences for shoppers. Tiffany’s recently opened a temporary concept store in Manhattan’s Rockefeller Center, with another location set to open in nearby Grand Central Terminal. Both stores will feature a selection of jewelry, home items and accessories.

According to Reed Krakoff, the chief artistic officer of Tiffany & Co., who led the redesign of the café and the adjoining home and accessories section, there was an emphasis on showcasing modern luxury. “The space is experimental and experiential – a window into the new Tiffany,” Mr. Krakoff said in a statement.

For generations of Hepburn fans, the outsized presence of the flagship store has allowed them to retrace her steps from the movie, but now they can truly have breakfast at Tiffany’s, 56 years after the film’s release.

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FUR FUR FUR

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Furs never miss the appeal of fashion shows, so I’m not an absolute novelty to see on the catwalk for the fall winter 2017 2018. The talk of a true return to fashion seems almost controversy as they rule sovereigns among the trends of cold season after year. Once again Fendi is an absolute champion, capable of decimating fur in a thousand variants. But beside him there is also Gareth Pugh who plays Gothic, for Gucci is total white. Whether ecological or natural fur (see mink fur), the imperative is to represent it with the innate class of those who want to bring forth primitive female instinctuality. A gentle, soft instinct, warm as a hug.


 

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